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Author Topic:   Differences Between the Book and the Play
The Knight of Emeralds
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posted 06-02-2005 11:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for The Knight of Emeralds     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have not yet seen the play, but there are some difference that I am aware of. I know that Elphaba's sister, Nessarose, has arms, she just has a problem with her feet. Also, it seems that Glinda is a more major character than in the book. Am I right?
Also, I am curious, what are the other differences?

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Elphaba
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posted 06-02-2005 11:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glinda is a much bigger character, Boq and Nessa get together, there is no Yackle or Dwarf, and there is much more contact with the Wizard. It makes more sense when compared to the 1939 movie of The Wizard of Oz, in some ways. It's a lot more light-hearted and fun than the book. In The Vinkus was cut completely.

*SPOILERS*


Boq becomes the Tin Man and Fiyero is for sure the Scarecrow. Also, Elphaba is not allergic to water, it is simply a rumour and she fakes her death with the help of Fiyero.

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Galinda
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posted 06-03-2005 11:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Galinda     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Elphaba:
It makes more sense when compared to the 1939 movie of The Wizard of Oz, in some ways.

The musical plays off of the 1939 movie, where as the book Wicked plays off the original Wizard of Oz by L.Frank Baum.

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Elphaba
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posted 06-03-2005 12:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Only in some ways, like how to explain Nessarose and the Tin Man.

The Wicked Witch was not green in the book. It's more a combination between the movie and the book. It sounds like he got the idea from being influenced by the movie as a child, and I'm sure he read the book when he decided to a write a massive novel about it.

[This message has been edited by Elphaba (edited 06-03-2005).]

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Matthew
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posted 06-05-2005 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Matthew     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
plus the plot has been simplified, and rightfully so, it would not work if it were 100% faithful to the novel. I repsect them both for what they are and as different stories in some aspects.

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The Knight of Emeralds
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posted 06-07-2005 11:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for The Knight of Emeralds     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The plot really had to be changed if you only had to be eight to see the play.

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Galinda
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posted 06-08-2005 09:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Galinda     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Elphaba:
The Wicked Witch was not green in the book. It's more a combination between the movie and the book.
[This message has been edited by Elphaba (edited 06-03-2005).]


Well, yes, that's true. Maguire did take the aspect of her being green from the movie, as well as Glinda being the Witch of the North, but it's mostly like the book, and not so much like the movie. Hence, the slippers are silver, the Emerald City's not really emerald, etc.

quote:
Originally posted by Elphaba:
It sounds like he got the idea from being influenced by the movie as a child, and I'm sure he read the book when he decided to a write a massive novel about it.

[This message has been edited by Elphaba (edited 06-03-2005).]


He actually got the idea when he was in England and he saw a headline describing Sadaam Hussein as the next Hitler. So, he wanted to write a book on the Holocaust, but he felt uncomfortable with the topic. Then later, he read about the murder of a young girl by two boys:

"the British press paid much attention to the nature of the crime. I became interested in the nature of evil, and whether one really could be born bad . . . But when I realized that nobody had ever written about the second most evil character in our collective American subconscious, the Wicked Witch of the West, I thought I had experienced a small moment of inspiration."


[This message has been edited by Galinda (edited 06-08-2005).]

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Elphaba
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posted 06-08-2005 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
He based the world of Oz on the books, but the Glinda and Elphaba are definitly based on the original 1939 movie. The Witch of the West doesn't even have a broom in the book.

Did anyone pick up on the funny Wizard of Oz books references in Wicked? I loved Grommetik and the magic dust that enchanted the antlers. There are so many little things like that that make reading Wicked so much more enjoyable.

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Breezer
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posted 06-11-2005 06:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Breezer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw the musical a little more than a week ago, and I've only read 3/5 of the book. From what I've read, I know the major differences between the musical and the book are:

*Possible Spoilers Beware*
**Please do not read this if you plan to see the show because I do not doubt it will ruin the play for you**

1. There is a love triangle in the play between Galinda, Fiyero and Elphaba.
2. Nessarose is in a wheelchair in the play, and Galinda tricks Boq into asking Nessa out.
3. Elphaba uses sorcery at the beginning of the play, and, impressed, Madam Morrible decides to train her.
4. Elphaba wishes to meet the wizard because she believes he will recognize her talents and could, eventually change her skin color.
5. Elphaba is the one who rescues the lion cub, and her passion is what makes Fiyero (who is a "scandalacious" prince) begin to like her.
6. Galinda changes her name to Glinda to show her passion for Elphaba's cause also, but it is obvious she changes it to impress Fiyero.
7. The line "Animals should be seen not heard" is written on the backside of a blackboard in Doctor Dillamond's classroom (who teaches history not biology).
8. In the play, the Animals, instead of losing their rights, are losing their ability to speak.
9. In the play, Galinda is a lot less smart, and is only taught sorcery by Madam Morrible because Elphaba insists.
10. The play's major focus in on the friendship between Elphaba and Glinda.
11. Boq becomes the tin man because when Elphaba fixes Nessarose's legs, he asks to leave her. Nessarose preforms magic, turns Boq to tin, and blames the incident on Elphaba.
12. In the play, Boq has less of a role.
13. When the oz national guard capture Elphaba, Fiyero tries to save her by threatening to shoot Glinda. When Elphaba is safe, Fiyero surrenders and the soldiers begin to beat, torture and kill him. This leads Elphaba to cast a spell to try and protect him. However, this only turns Fiyero into the Scarecrow (there are also suggestions throughout the musical of his "brainlessness").
14. Elphaba is not allergic to water. It is a rumour munchkinlanders made up. In the end, Elphaba was not melted, but escaped through a trapdoor. Fiyero pulls her out and they flee. However, Glinda believes Elphie to be dead and had promised Elphaba she would never tell the people that she was, in fact, good, because this would put her own life in danger. The end is emotional because Glinda has to sing in celebration of her best friend's death, and she will never know she is alive.


I really recommend seeing the musical because it is one of those experiences that gets better each time you think about it. Also, listen to the soundtrack on amazon and buy it if you like it. It is so funny and gives you the outline of the play.

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Elphaba
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posted 06-11-2005 09:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Actually, in the musical, Nessarose tried to "take" Boq's heart, because he claims to have lost it to G(a)linda. She can't read the Grimmerie and actually removes his heart, or shrinks it away. In order to save his life, Elphaba casts a spell to turn him to tin.

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therealgoodwitch
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posted 06-11-2005 10:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for therealgoodwitch     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, the musical really plays off of what people already know. The Wizard of Oz film in 1939 is a part of pop culture. Everyone knows it, and so to make a commercialized Broadway musical, it has to be based more on the movie's truths than the original novel's. The happiness in the musical has made the Broadway community embrace it as going back to the heart of the American musical. Maguire wrote a fabulous novel, and by allowing the playwrights to change the musical so radically, he has hit success. I became interested in the book, I'll admit because of the musical, and I don't see anything wrong in that. So, the things that are changed and the huge part of Glinda makes audiences happy, and if the audiences get interested, then the novel will be even more widely spread than it already is, and Maguire's talents wil be recognized once again.

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Fiyero
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posted 06-12-2005 08:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fiyero     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Really, I don't see anything "wrong" with changing the happenings in the novel to suit the stage: in essence, they're both the same story, just told in different ways through different mediums.

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Breezer
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posted 06-12-2005 03:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Breezer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Elphaba:
Actually, in the musical, Nessarose tried to "take" Boq's heart, because he claims to have lost it to G(a)linda. She can't read the Grimmerie and actually removes his heart, or shrinks it away. In order to save his life, Elphaba casts a spell to turn him to tin.

Oh ok. I had forgotten that part. It is too bad the song they sing at that point isn't on the CD. I think it is called "The Wicked Witch of the East."

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Elphaba
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posted 06-12-2005 03:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It is, but they thought it contained too many spoilers to put on the soundtrack. Also, a lot of it is dialogue.

Hopefully, they will release the full score and recordings in the future.

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defygravity
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posted 06-15-2005 02:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for defygravity     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Whoever is Elphaba, you should stop giving things away. It can ruin the experience for those who haven't seen the show or read the script.

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Elphaba
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posted 06-15-2005 11:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is already a warning against spoilers.

If you don't want to know things, don't read them!

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The Knight of Emeralds
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posted 06-15-2005 06:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for The Knight of Emeralds     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with Elphaba. Also, if you are reading this forum, then you should be prepared for spoilers, considering that I asked what the differences were between the book and the play, which I believe requires spoilers to adequetly answer the question

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Galinda
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posted 06-16-2005 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Galinda     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with Elphaba and The Knight of Emeralds. If you haven't seen the show and don't want to read any spoilers, then when you get to a post with a part that's marked *spoilers*, then you should just skip over it.

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defyinggravity
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posted 06-21-2005 06:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for defyinggravity   Click Here to Email defyinggravity     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I did see the musical just last week, and actually, I found many differences, none of which were dissapointing, except the very end. *spoiler, for anyone who hasnt seen the musical, so please don't read on because it will spoil it for you* Elphaba didn't die!!!! That just doesn't work!!! And i think the only reason is because they had to make a happy ending because that is a crowd pleaser after all, but i mean, it kind of changes the whole story around, you know? i was quite shocked actually because i had read the book a long time ago. but it was well done, the way they did it. just a shocker

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Galinda
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posted 06-23-2005 07:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Galinda     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
^

I agree, the end was a bit dissappointing in that aspect. But, I still kinda liked how it ended, 'cause it gave me a warm fuzzy feeling.

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nor
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posted 06-24-2005 07:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for nor   Click Here to Email nor     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
i quite like the ending to the show. *PLOT SPOILER* because even thoguh elphie and fiyero are reunited, they have to leave oz, and elphie's (if not fiyero's too) best friend, glinda. i think its heartbreaking. they have each other but they have to leave their home land and the people they love. for good and the finale always have me in tears when i listen to it. god knows what i'll be like when i go see it in NYC in 2 weeks!!

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ThroughDifferentEyes
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posted 06-30-2005 11:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ThroughDifferentEyes   Click Here to Email ThroughDifferentEyes     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I really agree with nor.

One of the frustrating things (to me) about the novel is that Elphaba's deadly aversion to water is never explained in any way (please clue me in if I missed it). Fiyero's line in the musical, "People are so empty-headed [ironic allusion], they'll believe anything" in reaction to the rumor that "water will melt her" is very believable. (Actually, when you think about the movie, The Wizard of Oz, the Witch's death by "liquidation" is quite unprepared for.)

In my opinion, the reason the musical's ending works so well is because, unlike the novel, its story is primarily the story of the friendship between Elphaba and Galinda. "Destroying the Witch" is not the necessary climax in this case. There is a different kind of seemingly final (and appropriate) loss in this story: "It well may be/That we will never meet again/In this lifetime...."


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the green girl
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posted 07-03-2005 03:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for the green girl   Click Here to Email the green girl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
i would assume that if you get ahold of the book first, you'll find a copy of the soundtrack soon thereafter. just listening to the songs is a spoiler.

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Fiyero
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posted 07-03-2005 06:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fiyero     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not necessarily-I got the soundtrack after only reading the novel, and was able to follow along fairly well without spoiling the show.

Yes, I may be just too stupid to have clued in, but through the soundtrack, I didn't realize Boq was the TinMan, the Wizard was the "Lover" (though eventually I guessed because of the hints from the book that he was Elphie's father), and didn't realize Fiyero was actually Glinda's fiancee. I thought she was engaged to someone else who just didn't talk and that she was still secretly in love with Fiyero.
Finally, perhaps most stupid of all, I didn't realize Elphaba lived in the end. I just thought her "spirit" was singing along with Glinda in the finale.

So if you're as stupid as I was in my early WICKED days, you'll have no problems with spoilers!

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Elphaba
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posted 07-03-2005 06:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elphaba   Click Here to Email Elphaba     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why woukld you feel stupid? I never would have guessed unless I saw the show. Which I did.

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NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished
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posted 07-04-2005 07:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished   Click Here to Email NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The play and the book are almost completely different. I found a site that goes through all of the differences. Visit http://www.innergeekdom.net/Essays/Wicked.htm to see all of the differences.

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Prince Fiyero
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posted 07-10-2005 01:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Prince Fiyero   Click Here to Email Prince Fiyero     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
i just posted a new theme about the ending of the musical, if you have time read it ant tell me what you think.

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stefebrock
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posted 06-21-2008 02:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for stefebrock   Click Here to Email stefebrock     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
bump

------------------
Don't take me too seriously, I might have already had my wine...lol

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Lola2.0
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posted 07-10-2008 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lola2.0     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Alright, I'm sorry if I repeat anything anyone has said. But does the play potray the religious and political conflicts of the book? Seriously, the way the book showed OZ as having politics and distinctive religions is what got me into it. Second of all, the bits and pieces I've seen of the play, make Fiyero seem like a real self-centered jerk. He wasn't like that in the book at all.

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gaddict123
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posted 09-13-2010 12:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gaddict123     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Lola2.0:
Alright, I'm sorry if I repeat anything anyone has said. But does the play potray the religious and political conflicts of the book? Seriously, the way the book showed OZ as having politics and distinctive religions is what got me into it. Second of all, the bits and pieces I've seen of the play, make Fiyero seem like a real self-centered jerk. He wasn't like that in the book at all.

Honestly I have yet to see the musical, but I don't think religion and politics are strongly themed, if at all an issue, in the play. And yes the Fiyero from the musical sort of has a completely different personality from the Fiyero in the book, not that we can get a truly deep impression from the book anyway since he's really only described in the scenes of being Elphie's lover.

But if you don't mind little spoilers from the music, you can get an idea of Fiyero's personality from Dancing Through Life.

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amandac2568
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posted 02-26-2011 05:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for amandac2568     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was actually highly disappointed about the play. As I had read the book before even hearing of the play, when watching it I couldn't help saying out loud during, to the annoyance of people around me, how unalike the 2 are. It was weird. The story lines were extremely different and it seemed to have been toned down of it's philosophy, political matters, religion and sex for the younger audience. For me it lost all of it's appeal. I do recognise that the musical is highly popular and people have there own opinions, but being a huge fan of Gregory Maguire's original work, this isn't for me. I thought it was cheesey. If it was a rock 'n' roll musical then it might have been a different matter but I doubt it. Anyone else think the same way?

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